If the patient's heart is already in ventricular fibrillation, there is no contraindication for a defibrillation shock. Adenosine . To deliver an electrical shock at that precise moment requires the shock to be synchronized to the heart's rhythm. Depending on the type of irregular heart rhythm you have, you could be at a higher risk of blood clots. A thin, flexible tube is put down your throat and into your esophagus. [6] Pharmacological cardioversion is an especially good option in patients with fibrillation of recent onset. Not all beta blockers are the same; some are cardio selective (affecting only beta 1 receptors) while others are non-selective (affecting beta 1 and 2 receptors). If you are treated at home, you will need careful follow-up with a cardiologist. Timing the shock to the R wave prevents the delivery of the shock during the vulnerable period (or relative refractory period) of the cardiac cycle, which could induce ventricular fibrillation. The electrical shock can be monophasic or biphasic and either direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC). Adenosyl (Ad) is the radical formed by removal of the 5'-hydroxy (OH) group. Patients who've experienced both electrical and pharmacological cardioversion usually describe pharmacological cardioversion as much less uncomfortable. In many cases, you can receive sedation and won't have any memory of the event. This is to help prevent blood clots. Ask your healthcare provider about the risks for you. Learn how and when to remove this template message, electrical conduction system of the heart, "ACC/AHA/ESC 2006 Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for Practice Guidelines (Writing Committee to Revise the 2001 Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation): developed in collaboration with the European Heart Rhythm Association and the Heart Rhythm Society", "ACC/AHA/ESC 2006 Guidelines for Management of Patients With Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for Practice Guidelines (writing committee to develop Guidelines for Management of Patients With Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death): developed in collaboration with the European Heart Rhythm Association and the Heart Rhythm Society", "Part 6: electrical therapies: automated external defibrillators, defibrillation, cardioversion, and pacing: 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care", Cardiology diagnostic tests and procedures, Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Cardioversion&oldid=981367297, Articles needing additional references from September 2009, All articles needing additional references, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, For narrow regular rhythms (atrial flutter and SVT), 50 to 100 joules for biphasic devices and 100 joules for monophasic devices, For ventricular tachycardia with a pulse, 100 joules for biphasic devices and 200 joules for monophasic devices, For ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia, 120–200 joules for biphasic devices and 360 joules for monophasic devices, This page was last edited on 1 October 2020, at 21:43.